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Everyone talks about the fruit notes in wine, but have you ever heard someone call a wine “salty?”

Everyone talks about the fruit notes in wine, but have you ever heard someone call a wine “salty?” As strange as it may sound, it’s a common flavor profile, and a delicious one at that. Whether you’re digging into a platter of oysters or sipping a glass on your patio, these intriguing whites are sure to give your palate a jolt.

La Poja (top right). Photo credit: Allegrini Estates

Aldo Fiordelli takes a closer look at a real rarity; a "cru" wine produced in Valpolicella.

La Poja is a “Chinese-box” cru on top of La Grola hill in Valpolicella, owned by the Allegrini estate.

Vines at Devil’s Corner winery, Apslawn, Tasmania.

Tasmanian wine can be hard to track down, but it’s well worth the effort!

The frustrating thing about this column is that many of the more interesting wines I come across aren’t very easy to track down. Tasmania is a case in point. This unique region of Australia is far cooler than anywhere else on the continent, and it has more in common with Champagne and Burgundy than with the Barossa Valley.

Rhys Vineyards, Santa Cruz Mountains. Photo credit: Rhys Vineyards

William Kelley picks the names to look out for...

Santa Cruz Mountains at a glance

Despite its budget reputation, Frontera has accumulated a devoted following from people around the country who think it tastes great.
“We used to drink pretty occasionally. But now that we’ve discovered the good cheap wine, we drink more frequently.”

On a recent trip to a Supermarket Fiesta in Houston, Rosa Garcia was lugging twelve bottles of Concha y Toro Frontera wine when a woman stopped her and asked her if that stuff was any good.