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Wine producers in Italy, Spain and France were ravaged by both hot and cold weather in 2017. Photo: Simon Whitehurst

Wine prices to rise as bad weather brings worst harvest for 50 years

Global production slumps to lowest level since 1961 as major growers hit by freakish weather.

It’s the kind of bad news best served with a stiff drink: the price of standard supermarket wines such as prosecco and pinot grigio could rise by up to 30% this year as the impact of 2017’s disastrous harvest is felt on the high street.

The Chinese government hopes that vineyards can help transform rural life.

Can Wine Transform China’s Countryside?

Ningxia’s wineries have been winning awards, but they are also part of Beijing’s new vision for rural life.

The city of Yinchuan, in northwestern China, is the capital of Ningxia, a tiny lozenge of land that accounts for just half a per cent of China’s population and a similarly tiny proportion of its landmass.

Last September, Frescobaldi made its first foray into the Chianti Classico region with the purchase of Castello di San Donato in Perano.

Frescobaldi Committed to Tuscan Investment

One of Italy’s oldest and most revered wine families, Frescobaldi, has revealed that it remains committed to making future wine investments in Tuscany.

Last September, Frescobaldi made its first foray into the Chianti Classico region with the purchase of Castello di San Donato in Perano for €13.3m.

If the FW100 looked a little shaky though, the broader Fine Wine 1000 index rumbled on in February, up 1.1% on its January finish. Source: Liv-ex.com

Broader Fine Wine Market Rules in February

While the Liv-ex Fine Wine 100 index trended downwards in February, the broader Fine Wine 1000 climbed to yet another record high.

The Fine Wine 100 index tracks the 100 most frequently traded labels on the secondary market and is the industry benchmark.

Some makers, such as West Sussex’s Bolney Estate, have also dared make delicate, light Pinots—another grape which can shake off a bit of cold.

English wine: the best of the bunch

Give these homegrown wines a chance and you won’t be disappointed.

It’s always been possible to grow grapes in England. The Romans probably did it and the Domesday Book records 42 vineyards. Prior to the 1980s most homegrown grapes were produced on a small scale or were sold en masse to produce fortified wine with names like ‘Tudor Rose’ and ‘Eldorado’.